Sarah Maclean Quotes

  1. I’m so thrilled to have won the RITA. The award is particularly special because it is given by other romance authors. It’s deeply rewarding and not a little humbling to be honored by such a talented tribe of writers.
  2. Even in 2014, when romance heroes are as varied as their genre, somewhere in them you can still always find the alpha male.
  3. At the heart of every successful romance novel lies the evolution of its characters. Through love, heroes and heroines grow not only into a perfect match, but into stronger, better, more admirable people.
  4. In fiction, as in real life, love might inspire acts that are at best foolish and at worst life-threatening, but in the best romances, love is the final, secret ingredient that turns mere mortals into heroes and heroines.
  5. There is a whole generation of romance readers and writers who suffer from what I like to think of as ‘Thorn Birds’ Fever.
  6. Critics seem to forget that every love story is different – that there is uniqueness in even the most commonplace of matches.
  7. Here’s the thing about romance novels: The moment when the hero and heroine discover that they’re perfect for each other is often the moment when it’s them against the world.
  8. Romance readers love a wealthy hero, and why not? There’s value in a man able to hire a helicopter, a coach and six horses, or a collection of werewolves to do his bidding – and the bidding of the lucky woman on his arm.
  9. Teenagers are asking, ‘Who am I?’ and ‘How do I fit in?’ in every aspect of their lives, and the best YA romances appreciate that there is more to a teen’s life than finding love.
  10. Perhaps summer’s ephemeral nature is what inspires us to embrace the beach read. We tell ourselves that these twisted plots and wild characters are literary ice cream sundaes – extravagant treats that aren’t as calorie-laden when we’re wearing flip flops.
  11. If you think back to your time as a teenager, everything was dramatic.
  12. Like so many others, I came to romance during the golden age of it – Judith McNaught, Julie Garwood, Johanna Lindsey and Jude Deveraux were at the height of their historical domination. Without those women, I wouldn’t be a romance novelist.
  13. One of the most common criticisms of romance is that the genre is too prescribed: If every romance novel ends happily ever after, don’t the stories lack complexity? Don’t the readers get bored?
  14. I think we can all agree that Colin Firth falls into the George Clooney category of ‘Men Who Age Like Fine Wine.’
  15. When it comes to love, the English language bears no shortage of cliches.
  16. ‘A Rogue by Any Other Name’ is the first book in the ‘Rules of Scoundrels’ series, centered on a legendary pre-Victorian casino and her four scandalous aristocratic owners.
  17. By the time I was 10 or 12, I had discovered the lure of the romance genre – and the dusty copy of ‘The Thorn Birds’ on my parents’ bookshelf.
  18. Gone are the days when heroes are emotionally locked away from the world until the end of the book, and thank goodness for that. Modern romance heroes are more complex than ever.
  19. In books by women and for women, it should come as no surprise that heroines are the heroes of the action, finding themselves, their power and their future through love.
  20. The best partnerships aren’t dependent on a mere common goal but on a shared path of equality, desire, and no small amount of passion.
  21. In seven books, I’ve written my fair share of baby epilogues. Pregnancies and births and even grandchildren have made an appearance in the final pages of my books.
  22. I’m not entirely sure why I write.
  23. As a romance novelist, I have a rather skewed view of babies. You see, they don’t typically fit into the classic structure of the romance novel – romance is about two people finding each other and falling in love against insurmountable odds. Babies… well… babies are complicated.
  24. As winter approaches – bringing cold weather and family drama – we crave page-turners, books made for long nights and tryptophan-induced sloth.
  25. For the most part, my characters don’t talk to me. I like to lord over them like some kind of benevolent deity. And, for the most part, my characters go along with it. I write intense character sketches and long, play-like conversations between me and them, but they stay out of the book writing itself.
  26. No matter how troubled a character’s history, romance novels tell us, love can be built upon it, and happily-ever-after can result. What’s more, the darker the past, the brighter the future – and the better the read.
  27. The best romance writers know there’s nothing that builds conflict or makes a gentleman of a rogue more quickly than responsibility.
  28. The trick to great romance is in overcoming adversity. In realizing that love is worth some uphill climbs.
  29. That first meeting – the one where the hero and heroine start the slow burn that takes the whole story to turn into true love – is the single most important part of the whole book. Nail it, and you’ve won yourself readers.
  30. Colleen McCullough taught me that desire is the heart of romance.
  31. Boring heroines are, in my opinion, the most common romance mistake. We loathe hanging out with women who define themselves purely through their relationships… why would we want to read about them?
  32. There is perhaps no more rewarding romance heroine than she who is not expected to find love. The archetype comes in many disguises – the wallflower, the spinster, the governess, the single mom – but always with one sad claim: Love is not in her cards.
  33. I want to wake up one morning and know how to write page one, or page 10, or page 250. But I never seem to know how to do it. Every book is different and takes a different structure, style, process, etc. And relearning how to write is where the insanity comes from.
  34. No doubt, much of the joy of a great romance is the moment when these stoic heroes crack open and reveal themselves to their heroines – the only women strong enough to match them.
  35. In real life, I’d say that your commitment-phobe/narcissist/bad boy boyfriend is a lost cause, but romance is shelved in fiction for a reason.
  36. I never met Colleen McCullough; if I had, I probably would have cried and made a fool of myself.
  37. Of all the myriad ways we define love, there is perhaps none more honest and powerful than this: Great love is rooted in great partnership.
  38. I think back on that day when 16-year-old me scribbled on some silly piece of paper for some long-forgotten high school career-day project that my dream job was ‘romance novelist.’
  39. As for the zone, I always find the zone immediately after I am sure I will never ever find the zone again because it has left me for some other, better writer.
  40. Alas, summer sun can’t last forever. The days will grow cooler and shorter, and our skin will once again pale.

This post was created with our nice and easy submission form. Create your post!

What do you think?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings