Seth Berkley Quotes

  1. When it comes to providing aid, developing innovations, and making bold steps that change the course of history, the United States is usually on the front lines.
  2. I love science, and I believe in it. I have a faith that science can solve problems and make the world a better place.
  3. GAVI works collaboratively with the private sector – from investment banks to vaccine suppliers to corporations to members of the Forbes 400 – to find new and better ways to raise and apply resources and broaden the base of participants in global health.
  4. In large part, thanks to widespread immunization, the number of young children dying each year has declined significantly, from approximately 14 million in 1979 to slightly less than eight million in 2010.
  5. I wish we could have state-of-the-art hospitals in every corner of the earth… but realistically, it’s going to be a while before that can happen. But we can immunise every kid on earth, and we can prevent these diseases. It’s only a matter of political will, a little bit of money and some systems to do it.
  6. Leadership is about vision and responsibility, not power.
  7. Historically, industrial revolutions haven’t been kind to poor people. Despite the potential benefits technology can offer, the immediate impact on the lowest-paid members of society has often been negative.
  8. Vaccines are extremely cost-effective, giving kids a healthy start in life and supporting the economic and educational foundations of entire communities. They directly lead to a healthy workforce, which is so critical to long-term development and prosperity in all countries.
  9. As cities get bigger, our best defence will be to prevent outbreaks in the first place by building better public health systems, improving childhood immunisation through better routine immunisation and pre-emptive vaccination campaigns.
  10. Investments in immunization yield a rate of return on a par with educating our children – and higher than nearly any other development intervention.
  11. No country in the post-colonial era has thrived without first building its capacity to conduct scientific research.
  12. Children who are healthy – and have adequate nutrition – are much more likely to attend school. People who finish school and do well have higher earning potential in their adult lives.
  13. The virus that causes AIDS is the trickiest pathogen scientists have ever confronted. It mutates furiously, it has decoys to evade the immune system, it attacks the very cells that are trying to fight it, and it quickly hides itself in your genome.
  14. The GAVI Alliance has achieved many things in its first dozen years, but none more important than helping save more than 5.5 million lives and prevent untold illness and suffering.
  15. Now, when you get a viral infection, what normally happens is it takes days or weeks for your body to fight back at full strength, and that might be too late. When you’re pre-immunized, what happens is you have forces in your body pre-trained to recognize and defeat specific foes. So that’s really how vaccines work.
  16. We know that children who are healthier do not require medical treatment or care, both of which cost time and money. So, by avoiding illness, infants have a greater chance of growing into healthier children who are able to attend school and become more productive members of society.
  17. New vaccines are being developed all the time, which could save many more lives and dramatically improve people’s health. And this goes beyond the traditional burden of childhood infectious diseases.
  18. You can’t stop wars to build tertiary teaching hospitals, but you can say, ‘Let’s stop for a couple of days to immunise the kids.’ It has been done.
  19. You’d see little shallow graves, lined up, one after the other – babies. That’s what happens when measles goes through a nutritionally deficient community. It’s a horrible disease, and it spreads incredibly efficiently.
  20. Healthy children are more likely to attend school and are better able to learn. Healthy workers are more productive. More productive economies mean greater stability in developing countries and improved security in the West.
  21. Now, you might think of flu as just a really bad cold, but it can be a death sentence. Every year, 36,000 people in the United States die of seasonal flu. In the developing world, the data is much sketchier, but the death toll is almost certainly higher.
  22. In an increasingly complex world, we have a simple and bold vision that all children should have the opportunity to grow up healthy.
  23. If you want to know the value of vaccines, just spend some time in a clinic in Africa. The faces of the mothers and fathers say it all: vaccines prevent illness and save lives.
  24. Measles is probably the best argument for why there needs to be global health, and why we have to think about it as a global public good. Because in a sense, measles is the canary in the coal mine for immunization. It is, you know, highly transmissible. The vaccine costs 15 cents, so it’s not – you know, shouldn’t be an issue in terms of cost.
  25. More people living in less space can put greater strain on already limited sanitation resources, and this can create a fertile breeding ground for waterborne infectious disease and the insects spreading them.
  26. The World Economic Forum Annual Meeting is the perfect place for a dialogue that brings together industry, civil society, U.N. agencies, and countries around a shared response to the challenge of protecting children against vaccine-preventable illness.
  27. By recognizing that infectious disease is not some faraway exotic issue but a global problem, and by sharing the responsibility for its prevention, diagnosis, and control, the whole world will be a lot safer.
  28. Leadership is about vision and responsibility, not power. And I try to model that in all of my interactions.
  29. I was a serial monogamist.
  30. Finding innovative ways to deliver vaccines to children in developing countries is at the heart of our work. The very fact that we don’t have people on the ground but rather work in an alliance with other organizations is itself an innovation that was the basis of GAVI’s establishment in 2000.
  31. The pathway to a more sustainable future for all children must include access to the basic building blocks of good health, including nutrition, water, and immunizations.
  32. Yellow fever outbreaks are not uncommon. But, as with other infectious diseases, when they occur in urban areas, they can play out very differently – not least in terms of the speed and scale at which they can spread.
  33. The return on investment in global health is tremendous, and the biggest bang for the buck comes from vaccines. Vaccines are among the most successful and cost-effective health investments in history.
  34. Without strong health systems in place, the higher the population density, the more difficult it becomes to prevent and control outbreaks, and not just because of the increased risk of contagion.
  35. In global health, emergency vaccine stockpiles are like the insurance policy you never really wanted to take out: you resent the cost and have mixed feelings about never making a claim. Moreover, given that a stockpile is often a last resort, if you ever fall back on it, you have, in some way, already failed.
  36. History will not judge HIV/AIDS kindly… the harshest words will be reserved for how the world responded, or rather failed to respond, to the epidemic.
  37. Land degradation, rising sea levels, famine, and conflict will continue to drive people from their homes and towards cities, with megacities like Mexico City and Lagos becoming increasingly common in some of the poorest parts of the world.
  38. We’ve actually eliminated Type II polio in the world, at least as far as we can tell.
  39. When AIDS first appeared, people didn’t know what it was. You’ll remember that it affected mostly young gay men – it was actually called GRID for a short period of time: Gay-Related Immunodeficiency Syndrome – and people thought it actually might be recreational drugs or other types of toxins.
  40. For just a few dollars a dose, vaccines save lives and help reduce poverty. Unlike medical treatment, they provide a lifetime of protection from deadly and debilitating disease. They are safe and effective. They cut healthcare and treatment costs, reduce the number of hospital visits, and ensure healthier children, families and communities.
  41. Science is one of the comparative advantages of our knowledge-based economy, and focusing on our prowess in providing better tools to address diseases of poverty is one of the best forms of foreign aid.
  42. As megacities like Mexico City and Lagos become increasingly common, we could see a rise of the urban epidemic and a new era of infectious disease threatening global health security.
  43. As more and more people adopt an urban lifestyle and cities continue to swell, not only does the risk of urban epidemics increase – something we haven’t seen much of for decades – but the need for larger emergency stockpiles can increase, too.
  44. As demonstrated by the emergence of the Mexican swine flu in the U.S., infectious diseases have little respect for borders; helping developing countries detect and deal with their diseases is the surest way for us to protect ourselves from new and potentially devastating epidemics.
  45. With infectious disease, without vaccines, there’s no safety in numbers.

This post was created with our nice and easy submission form. Create your post!

What do you think?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings